Black History Month

28 Common racist attitudes and behaviors

St. Cloud State University’s Office of Equity and Affirmative Action created a 28 Common Racist Attitudes and Behaviors Guide in 2005. I had just discovered it and wanted to share it with you – it’s still so relevant! Here are a few great points taken from the guide – and you can download the full guide here!  And don’t forget to check out our free Black History Issue! 3. Reverse Racism. A. “People of color are just as racist as white people.” B. “Affirmative action had a role years ago,…

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Black History Month: Thurgood Marshall

Thurgood Marshall was born on July 2, 1908, in Baltimore, Maryland. One of his father’s favorite pastimes was to listen to cases at the local courthouse before returning home to rehash the lawyers’ arguments with his sons. Thurgood Marshall later recalled, “Now you want to know how I got involved in law? I don’t know. The nearest I can get is that my dad, my brother, and I had the most violent arguments you ever heard about anything. I guess we argued five out of seven nights at the dinner…

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Black History Month: Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Born a slave in 1862, Ida Bell Wells was the oldest daughter of James and Lizzie Wells. The Wells family, as well as the rest of the nation’s slaves, were freed about six months after Ida’s birth, thanks to the Emancipation Proclamation. However, living in Mississippi as African Americans, they faced racial prejudices and were restricted by discriminatory rules and practices. Ida B. Wells’s father served on the first board of trustees for Rust College and made education a priority for his seven children. It was there that Wells received…

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Black History Month: Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.” Tubman was born a slave in Maryland’s Dorchester County around 1820. At age five or six, she began to work as a house servant. Seven years later she was sent to work in the fields. While she was…

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Black History Month: Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass stood at the podium, trembling with nervousness. Before him sat abolitionists who had travelled to the Massachusetts island of Nantucket. Only 23 years old at the time, Douglass overcame his nervousness and gave a stirring, eloquent speech about his life as a slave. Douglass would continue to give speeches for the rest of his life and would become a leading spokesperson for the abolition of slavery and for racial equality. The son of a slave woman and an unknown white man, “Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey” was born in…

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