Kevin Cobbin, Alexander’s attorney, said his client was justified in firing her gun because Gray “had put his hands on her and there was a fight in the bathroom.” “The judge decided not to make the call to grant ‘stand your ground,’ ” Cobbin said. “If it had been a white female, I believe she would have.” In recent news about the Zimmerman case, I have many conflicting feelings as many do. First, I would like to say that there is no doubt in my mind that Zimmerman should be incarcerated –  because he should. The outcome of this case could have severe consequences. For one, it could be the beginning of several similar cases, as the public sees that justice isn’t being served and the system is skewed. Zimmerman’s light skin, despite his hispanic background, perpetuates the “white people are let go” privilege that an unbiased, fair judicial system is supposed to protect everyone against. My second fear is that this will only perpetuate more racism in the highly emotional debates following this case. In cases like Trayvon Martin’s death, it becomes clear that racism is far from eradicated. A good majority are ashamed that the law has failed to serve justice and don’t want it to be a reflection of their own values, which do not agree with the verdict. I personally don’t want to be disliked and labeled because of the actions of Zimmerman. I believe the judicial system has failed because it freed a man who killed a boy. Not a “black boy” but a BOY. In a better world, it would have nothing to do with race. I wish we could stop looking at people as a “color” and instead look at the facts, the person’s personality and their motive. However, the reason this case is so awful is because of the racial motivation and prejudiced attitudes that might have influenced the confrontation. We’ve come a long way, but still have so much further to go before we don’t have to worry about prejudice-based attitudes behind crimes. According to reports, Zimmerman does have a history of racist behavior, although he does seem to be overall troubled.

Singer Jennifer Hudson posted a photo of herself on Instagram with a particularly poignant message. "It's time to turn all of that into this -LOVE," she wrote in a subtle reference to the recent, controversial verdict in the George Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin case.

Singer Jennifer Hudson posted a photo of herself on Instagram with a particularly poignant message. “It’s time to turn all of that into this -LOVE,” she wrote in a subtle reference to the recent, controversial verdict in the George Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin case.

Another Florida trial was thrown into the spotlight after the Zimmerman case – the 2010 trial of Marissa Alexander – which happened only 125 miles away from Zimmerman’s town. Marissa, a mother of three, had fired a warning shot in the direction of her husband (she had a protective order against him) and her two stepsons. She was convicted of attempted murder and was sentenced to 20 years, although no one was injured. Does that make any logical sense at all? The system also failed Marissa – a case of sexism AND racism! Kevin Cobbin, Alexander’s attorney, said, “The judge decided not to make the call to grant ‘Stand Your Ground’. If it had been a white female, I believe she would have.” The Zimmerman trial has drawn renewed attention to Marissa’s case and people are taking action via the internet to seek a pardon from Florida Governor Rick Scott. This world will not get any better if racism does not stop. I myself experienced racism as a little girl coming from Europe to America – I was  mocked, bullied, antagonized and even called a Nazi just because of my origin and olive complexion. It affected me but I always kept my faith that there were still good people left in this world. I was raised to respect each individual and not judge unless given a reason depending on the circumstance. In God’s (or another higher power’s) eyes we are all equal – why the hostility and ongoing judgement about the color of one’s skin? My motto is and always will be “learn history, but do not live it!” Think of the future generations. Please. Thank you.